If you ever feel bad, just relax. Take a deep breath, turn off your phone, light some candles, run a nice hot bath, & go bobbing for apples in it. It’s nice.

you're so vain and conceited??? what the fcuk???

@Anonymous

Big thanks to me for being very attractive. Good job.

Have you seen the video of the inuit girl from canada who essentially defends seal clubbing because it is culturally important and also for the weather? i think it's important to consider that side too

@Anonymous

muskfawn:

zubat:

The problem with cultural “traditions” is when these so-called “values” stomp on the rights or welfare of others. 

In 2009, a legislation in Afghanistan was approved which “legalized the rape of a wife by her husband” by allowing men to force sexual intercourse on their spouse. It was considered “a piece of sharia law, or Islamic law.”

I mean, rape is really bad and stuff… but it’s culturally important so maybe we should be more understanding about it & consider their side too.

No values or traditions deserve to remain in place just because they have been for hundreds/thousands of years if they infringe on the rights or welfare of others. That includes seal hunting. 

there’s a huge!!!! difference between rape and killing animals as a source of food and material. I don’t think you understand how expensive everything is in northern canada - food items have a 50-300% mark-up. taking away the right to hunt animals like seals and whales (the endangered of which were endangered by white hunting practices) is really unethical.

Except… this message was in reference to a post I made about Canada’s commercialized seal hunt, which is severely barbaric & inhumane.

So I mean… you can continue whining about how taking away the right to hunt is “unethical” while conveniently ignoring ethics when: competitive, commercial pressures make speed more important than humane killing; seal hunting involves unacceptably high wounding rates; the current Marine Mammal Regulations do not set out requirements for humane killing of seals; effective monitoring and enforcement is impossible; and endemic disregard for the Regulations indicates the Department of Fisheries and Oceans is unwilling - and unable - to enforce any rules that might be in place. 

There’s a difference between hunting for survival (ie: the San people) and commercialized hunting, which is what this person was referring to by mentioning “seal clubbing.”

Reading comprehension. 

[points at you] you’re wonderful & I love you!!!

Ancient Puppy Paw Prints Found on Roman Tiles
"They are beautiful finds, as they represent a snapshot, a single moment in history," said Nick Daffern, a senior project manager with Wardell Armstrong Archaeology. "It is lovely to imagine some irate person chasing a dog or some other animal away from their freshly made tiles."
The artifacts, which could be nearly 2,000 years old, were found in the Blackfriars area of Leicester, the English city where the long-lost bones of King Richard III were discovered under a parking lot in 2012. 
(Read the full article on Discovery)

Ancient Puppy Paw Prints Found on Roman Tiles

"They are beautiful finds, as they represent a snapshot, a single moment in history," said Nick Daffern, a senior project manager with Wardell Armstrong Archaeology. "It is lovely to imagine some irate person chasing a dog or some other animal away from their freshly made tiles."

The artifacts, which could be nearly 2,000 years old, were found in the Blackfriars area of Leicester, the English city where the long-lost bones of King Richard III were discovered under a parking lot in 2012. 

(Read the full article on Discovery)

(Source: nextyearsgirl)

Have you seen the video of the inuit girl from canada who essentially defends seal clubbing because it is culturally important and also for the weather? i think it's important to consider that side too

@Anonymous

The problem with cultural “traditions” is when these so-called “values” stomp on the rights or welfare of others. 

In 2009, a legislation in Afghanistan was approved which “legalized the rape of a wife by her husband” by allowing men to force sexual intercourse on their spouse. It was considered “a piece of sharia law, or Islamic law.”

I mean, rape is really bad and stuff… but it’s culturally important so maybe we should be more understanding about it & consider their side too.

No values or traditions deserve to remain in place just because they have been for hundreds/thousands of years if they infringe on the rights or welfare of others. That includes seal hunting. 

sfilate:

Yohji Yamamoto F/W 2014

sfilate:

Yohji Yamamoto F/W 2014

My baby sister keeps trying to feed me her waffles by shoving the bite-sized pieces into my face and saying “bite” until I accept. When I eat it from her hands, she’ll say “mmm yum!”

Supersonic travel may be coming down to Earth in a supersonic car designed to go 1,000 MPH
When we’re talking about supersonic travel, usually there are rockets involved — or maybe a daredevil skydiver. But those speeds may be coming down to Earth in a supersonic car designed to go 1,000 miles per hour.
Since 2008, a UK team has been developing a ground vehicle called the Bloodhound Supersonic Car. Engineers are packing jet and rocket power into a slender car about 46 feet long, weighing more than 7 tons. Their goal is to build one that can go more than 1,000 miles per hour — that’s Mach 1.3 — by 2016.
Swansea University lecturer Ben Evans and his colleague Chris Rose recently simulated the aerodynamic characteristics of the Bloodhound SSC design using computational fluid dynamics. Reporting in the Journal of Automobile Engineering (PDF), they concluded that the design “has a benign lift distribution across the whole Mach range of interest and a sufficiently low drag coefficient” to achieve its objective.
That’s good news, but driving the beast won’t be easy. Besides being “shaken, compressed, disorientated, deafened and heated,” Bloodhound SSC driver Andy Green will experience G forces that push him hard into his seat back. Acceleration and deceleration will mess with his blood pressure, pushing him close to losing consciousness.
Engine and ground vibrations may also make it nearly impossible for Green to see the instruments clearly. Fortunately he’s a fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force so he’s used to being uncomfortable at high speeds.
The Bloodhound SSC team plans to have a car capable of going 800 mph ready next year. They’ll take it to a dirt track nearly 12 miles long in Hakskeen Pan, in northwestern South Africa. Evans and Rose reported that questions remain about how shock waves will interact with the ground, especially if they cause the dirt surface to break up. The engineers plan to continue refining their computer models.
You really can’t have too many computer simulations with a rocket-car.
Source: Supersonic Car: What It’ll Be Like To Drive At 1,000 MPH

Supersonic travel may be coming down to Earth in a supersonic car designed to go 1,000 MPH

When we’re talking about supersonic travel, usually there are rockets involved — or maybe a daredevil skydiver. But those speeds may be coming down to Earth in a supersonic car designed to go 1,000 miles per hour.

Since 2008, a UK team has been developing a ground vehicle called the Bloodhound Supersonic Car. Engineers are packing jet and rocket power into a slender car about 46 feet long, weighing more than 7 tons. Their goal is to build one that can go more than 1,000 miles per hour — that’s Mach 1.3 — by 2016.

Swansea University lecturer Ben Evans and his colleague Chris Rose recently simulated the aerodynamic characteristics of the Bloodhound SSC design using computational fluid dynamics. Reporting in the Journal of Automobile Engineering (PDF), they concluded that the design “has a benign lift distribution across the whole Mach range of interest and a sufficiently low drag coefficient” to achieve its objective.

That’s good news, but driving the beast won’t be easy. Besides being “shaken, compressed, disorientated, deafened and heated,” Bloodhound SSC driver Andy Green will experience G forces that push him hard into his seat back. Acceleration and deceleration will mess with his blood pressure, pushing him close to losing consciousness.

Engine and ground vibrations may also make it nearly impossible for Green to see the instruments clearly. Fortunately he’s a fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force so he’s used to being uncomfortable at high speeds.

The Bloodhound SSC team plans to have a car capable of going 800 mph ready next year. They’ll take it to a dirt track nearly 12 miles long in Hakskeen Pan, in northwestern South Africa. Evans and Rose reported that questions remain about how shock waves will interact with the ground, especially if they cause the dirt surface to break up. The engineers plan to continue refining their computer models.

You really can’t have too many computer simulations with a rocket-car.

Source: Supersonic Car: What It’ll Be Like To Drive At 1,000 MPH

What's the difference between carnage and venom?

@Anonymous

Im having a depressing day. Can you tell me facts about venom ?

@Anonymous

Yes I can, darling.

  1. Symbiotes are a race of amorphous extraterrestrial parasites. The Venom Symbiote is a symbiotic organism from Battleworld — a planet that was created by The Beyonder, who used parts of different planets to create a battlefield for the heroes and villains of earth — who feeds on adrenaline and grants spider-like powers to its owner.
  2. According to the Planet of the Symbiotes story line, the Venom Symbiote was deemed insane by its own race after it was discovered that it desired to commit to its host rather than use it up. The Symbiote was then imprisoned on Battleworld to ensure it didn’t pollute the species’ gene pool.
  3. Symbiotes do not exclusively bond to one being. Carnage is an exception because the Carnage Symbiote merged with Cletus Kasady’s bloodstream. Although Eddie Brock was the original long-term host, a number of people have worn the Venom Symbiote over the years, including Flash Thompson and Mac Gargan (also known as Scorpion). 
  4. The Venom Symbiote has appeared in over 1,300 issues. 
  5. Venom was ranked as the 22nd Greatest Comic Book Villain of All Time in IGN’s list of the top 100 comic villains, and 33rd on Empire Magazine’s 50 Greatest Comic Book Characters.
  6. Eddie Brock got cancer from from the prolonged exposure to the Venom Symbiote. Eventually his cancer was cured and his cells retroactively created a new symbiote known as Anti-Venom.
  7. A fan from Illinois actually created the idea for Venom, and his idea was purchased by Marvel for $220 in 1982. Mike Zeck then modified the idea into becoming a symbiote costume, and David Michelinie later wrote the back story of Eddie Brock as its new host.
  8. In Return of Venom, Venom eats the Carnage Symbiote after defeating it in battle… and is poisoned, ultimately losing the battle.
  9. Sam Raimi, director of the original Spider-Man trilogy, hates Venom.
  10. Eddie Brock’s ex-wife Ann Weying was also a host for Venom, known as She-Venom. The symbiote bonded with her to save her life after she was shot by Sin-Eater in The Amazing Spider-Man #375. Once separated from the symbiote, she was so traumatized she committed suicide in fear of the symbiote returning to her.
Injectable oxygen could save patients with abnormally low levels of oxygen
An artist in Beijing just sold jars of fresh air for $845 and residents in Zhengzhou lined up to breathe mountain air from bags. With air pollution getting worse everywhere, we may have to resort to injecting ourselves with oxygen particles.
Injectable oxygen has actually been in development for a while now. Cardiologist John Kheir, a Boston Children’s Hospital staff physician and pediatrics instructor at Harvard Medical School, is leading the charge. He and his colleagues are developing ways to administer oxygen intravenously through gas-filled microparticles (via inhabitat.com).
Kheir first set out to develop the microparticles after a young patient of his died from a rare complication of pneumonia. It took years but his team successfully created an injectable foam suspension containing pure oxygen gas microparticles encapsulated by a layer of lipids. When mixed with human blood, the small particles revived oxygen-starved human blood in seconds.
The injection was first tested on rabbits whose breathing tubes were blocked for 15 minutes, mimicking what had happened to Kheir’s young patient. Animals treated with what Kheir called “today’s standard of care” stopped breathing and those that survived had severe organ injuries. All the rabbits treated with the injection, except one, survived without a single breath and none had organ injuries.
More recently the team has been trying to optimize the injection’s shelf life and performance. Once it’s available, injectable oxygen could save patients with abnormally low levels of oxygen in their blood or those who need extra oxygen delivered to organs at risk for failure — without requiring surgery.
Given the news, it’s also easy to imagine injectable oxygen becoming commonplace where air quality is bad. A report released this year concluded that air pollution killed 7 million people worldwide in 2012 (via The New York Times). Perhaps such high stakes are making work on an injection feel more pressing than ever.
Photo source: Bubbles of oxygen by ntr23 / News source: Forget Masks, Go For the Injectable Oxygen

Injectable oxygen could save patients with abnormally low levels of oxygen

An artist in Beijing just sold jars of fresh air for $845 and residents in Zhengzhou lined up to breathe mountain air from bags. With air pollution getting worse everywhere, we may have to resort to injecting ourselves with oxygen particles.

Injectable oxygen has actually been in development for a while now. Cardiologist John Kheir, a Boston Children’s Hospital staff physician and pediatrics instructor at Harvard Medical School, is leading the charge. He and his colleagues are developing ways to administer oxygen intravenously through gas-filled microparticles (via inhabitat.com).

Kheir first set out to develop the microparticles after a young patient of his died from a rare complication of pneumonia. It took years but his team successfully created an injectable foam suspension containing pure oxygen gas microparticles encapsulated by a layer of lipids. When mixed with human blood, the small particles revived oxygen-starved human blood in seconds.

The injection was first tested on rabbits whose breathing tubes were blocked for 15 minutes, mimicking what had happened to Kheir’s young patient. Animals treated with what Kheir called “today’s standard of care” stopped breathing and those that survived had severe organ injuries. All the rabbits treated with the injection, except one, survived without a single breath and none had organ injuries.

More recently the team has been trying to optimize the injection’s shelf life and performance. Once it’s available, injectable oxygen could save patients with abnormally low levels of oxygen in their blood or those who need extra oxygen delivered to organs at risk for failure — without requiring surgery.

Given the news, it’s also easy to imagine injectable oxygen becoming commonplace where air quality is bad. A report released this year concluded that air pollution killed 7 million people worldwide in 2012 (via The New York Times). Perhaps such high stakes are making work on an injection feel more pressing than ever.

Photo source: Bubbles of oxygen by ntr23 / News source: Forget Masks, Go For the Injectable Oxygen

Psylocke by Olivier Coipel

Psylocke by Olivier Coipel

Hey! I haven’t eaten meat in 43 days & I haven’t self-harmed in 76 days! I’m so incredibly proud of myself!